Lessons from Hard Weeks and 6th Street

Last week was one of those weeks that drained me both physically and mentally. On paper, it sucked. We lost a client, postponed conversations with a big-time lead (perhaps indefinitely), and put out fires left and right. My to-do list, which had been meticulously prepared at the beginning of the week, remained untouched. It was one of those weeks where I felt like I was running in circles doing things that I didn’t want to do.

Perhaps you’ve experienced it too. Times where, despite your best efforts, everything seems menial.

I’ve read/listened to enough self-help “experts” to know that everyone experiences moments like these. Often times the prescribed solution is to:

  • Find your passion!
  • Quit the boring things and do what you love!
  • Focus more!
  • Concentrate on the things that matter and cut out everything else!

While I’m sure there are certain truths to all of these statements, I think it misses the point. At our core, we all face situations like this. It’s part of growing up. The solution isn’t in avoiding the rough weeks—because you can’t— but embracing it.

There’s something beautiful in being stretched, walking through haze, and gasping for air because you’re utterly exhausted. It’s these moments that teach us who we are and how far we’ve come. I remember the darkest moments in my life also happened to be the ones that grew me the most.

Every once in awhile, I’ll experience moments that remind me that I’m different — in a good way. As an example, I went out to 6th street on Saturday night to see high school friends whom I hadn’t seen in 7+ years. I don’t like going out, especially after a long week. The relationship between 6th street and myself has produced a silent, brooding, animosity between us; it’s a mutual feeling.

Yet, looking back at this weekend, I’ve grown to appreciate the nightlife. Not because of the surroundings, but because of the people. I’ve learned – and am still learning—to appreciate people. There’s joy to be found there and I’m glad that I was able to experience it.

So I guess what I’m getting at is that life doesn’t get easier. Situations don’t always get better. But I get better.

And that’s comforting.

 

*I’LL BUY A FREE CUP OF COFFEE TO THE FIRST PERSON TO CORRECTLY GUESS IN THE COMMENTS BELOW WHICH COFFEE SHOP I’M AT*

And so I sit here on a Monday morning at one of my favorite coffee shops in Austin contemplating my week; not knowing if it’ll be a high or low, but knowing that I’m growing and I’m getting better. Each week I get better. And you do too.

Regardless of the outcomes and situations of this week, we carry on.

Wesley Fang